Category Archives: Tree of the Week

The Surprising Kinkade Creek Fir

If you’re an aspiring tree hunter, or if you’re just looking for something to explore, there are times that new discoveries have a way of staring you in the face. What I mean by that is that on your quest for other objectives, whether well known or obscure, you might just encounter something interesting along the way. That was the case yesterday, when I decided to investigate a sizeable Douglas Fir that I had noticed a couple of years ago.

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The Unheralded Stoney Creek Fir

Nearly nine kilometres along the Seymour Valley Trailway, in North Vancouver’s Lower Seymour Conservation Reserve (LSCR), stands a distinctively towering Douglas Fir. It receives thousands and thousands of visitors every year, standing as it does, alongside a popular recreational trail.

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A Remnant of Yesteryear: The Kitty Coleman Fir

There was a time that the east coast of Vancouver Island was home to countless stands of ancient Douglas Fir trees that numbered among the finest British Columbia had to offer. While it’s well documented that most of them fell to the crosscut saws of the colonial era, there are, if you take the time to search, some remaining gems to be seen. One such tree is the one I call the Kitty Coleman Fir. Reputed to be the largest remaining tree in the Comox Valley by some accounts, it rests in a quiet clearing in its namesake park, just as it has for centuries.

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Saving the North Shore’s Big Cedar, a Call to Action

 

At the dawn of the twentieth century, old growth forests in the North Shore Mountains were taken for granted. So many massive trees still stood tall and strong then that it was believed their supply was nearly infinite. In today’s era, sadly, we know better. The few ancient specimens that persevere are invaluable to our heritage and ecology!  Continue reading Saving the North Shore’s Big Cedar, a Call to Action

The Westside Cedar

The Big Cedar Trail to Kennedy Falls is aptly named. Roughly two and half kilometres from the trailhead, the track leads intrepid hikers to an ancient Western Red Cedar that’s over six hundred and fifty years old! Ironically, however, those who reach it have often unknowingly walked right by an equally formidable specimen. Continue reading The Westside Cedar

The Wickenden Creek Giant

It sits in silence, even unobtrusively, in a clearing in the Wickenden Creek valley. That in itself is quite a feat, because this ancient Western Red Cedar measures in at 4.85 metres in diameter, which is just a shade under sixteen feet wide! The Wickenden Creek Giant is one of the most impressive cedars I’ve seen on British Columbia’s mainland, and the fact that it still stands today is a miracle in itself! Continue reading The Wickenden Creek Giant

Mick Bailey – Hunting Giants in British Columbia

Hi readers! This week I thought I’d share this interview I did recently with Greg from Terra Mano. It’s the subject this week of his Stories from the Mountain feature. Telling my own story behind the adventures is not something I tend to do, so this was fun. Read on, for the story behind the stories!  

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The Rustic Charm of the Arbutus Tree

 

If you live in Southwestern British Columbia, no doubt you’ll remember your first encounter with the Arbutus. It makes quite a captivating first impression, and with its multiple trunks, peeling red bark, and rhododendron like leaves, this is a tree that compels you to look skyward at its twisting limbs Continue reading The Rustic Charm of the Arbutus Tree

The Hollyburn Giant

It stands in a clearing of its own creation, amid a forest that has somehow not seen the ravages of fire for over four thousand years. They call it the Hollyburn Giant, and though it’s merely a shadow of what it once was, this legendary tree has been estimated to be as old as 1400 years. Sometimes confused with the Hollyburn Fir, this Yellow Cedar grows on the opposite side of Hollyburn Mountain, and at a much higher elevation. It’s one of the many wonders of British Columbia’s Cypress Provincial Park Continue reading The Hollyburn Giant

Finding Norvan’s Castle

 

It conjures up the grandest of images, like, say, the sturdiest of stone castles standing high on a bluff above the crashing waves of the North Sea, seemingly indestructible. While that may be fun to imagine, how many among you would have thought the name actually referred to a tree? Set deep within the forests of Lynn Headwaters Regional Park, Norvan’s Castle is, by volume, the fourth largest Western Hemlock on the planet. Its nine and a half foot diameter at breast height also makes it the widest one on record! The three trees that are of larger volume are all found south of the border on Washington state’s Olympic Peninsula.

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