Mt Bishop, In Tribute to Fred Mills

Well secluded in a remote corner of Mt Seymour Provincial Park is a 1508 metre peak that towers high above the Seymour Valley to its west, and the waters of the Indian Arm  to the east. That mountain is Mt Bishop. It was named for Charles Joseph Bishop, the first president of the British Columbia Mountaineering Club (BCMC ), who died in a crevasse fall Continue reading Mt Bishop, In Tribute to Fred Mills

John Day Fossil Beds, Painted Hills Unit

When most people plan a visit to Oregon, they’re thinking about the pounding surf of the Pacific Ocean, walking on warm sands, or maybe experiencing the rage of coastal storms, from a distance. Still others might pay a visit to Mt Hood and its neighbouring peaks, or even Crater Lake National Park. Few if any have even heard about the three units of John Day Fossil Beds National Monument Continue reading John Day Fossil Beds, Painted Hills Unit

Burwell Ridge Rocks!

As you examine the peaks of the North Shore Mountains from the north shore of Burrard Inlet, the highest mountain visible is one whose name escapes most of the people of Vancouver. That mountain, and its broad, accompanying ridge, is called Mt. Burwell Continue reading Burwell Ridge Rocks!

Traversing the Ridge of Chanter

Tucked away on the sharp divide separating Cyrtina Creek and Furry Creek, the unofficially named Chanter Peak, approached via its western sub peaks looked to be an adventurous ascent.  Simon had done all the research, and his promise of grand views with a challenging climb was more than enough to pique my curiosity! Continue reading Traversing the Ridge of Chanter

Welcome to the Jungle!

There are times when I write about a trip in the mountains that I struggle to find the right words to tell the tale, and then there are the stories that almost write themselves, and this one is definitely the latter! It all began innocently enough, with an email from Doug. He had studied his maps and came up with the idea to traverse The Needles, an obscure group of wooded summits north of Lynn Ridge and deep in the heart of the North Shore Mountains. They were steep, largely unknown to most, and shrouded in mystery. They still are Continue reading Welcome to the Jungle!

The Eagles of Delta

I had heard from  my father in law that there were plenty of eagles to be seen in the River Road area of Delta and the roads nearer the Vancouver Landfill, so today we set out to see if we could find any. We had made the trip out last year but the camera I brought wasn’t quite up to the task of photographing them. This time Continue reading The Eagles of Delta

North Shore Boys Storm the South Needle

It was, of all things, a chance encounter. He had read several of my trip reports, posted on a hiking forum, on relatively obscure pursuits in the North Shore Mountains, and simply sent me a message. At first I was not even certain I’d answer, as I’m given to solo pursuits, but for whatever reason I did. That was in late May of 2004, and it likely marked a distinct change in the course of both of our lives. That was how I met Doug, who has become a regular partner in crime on so many of my most enjoyable trips, and one of my closest friends Continue reading North Shore Boys Storm the South Needle

The Saga of the Red Creek Fir, Part 3 of 3

Time now for the conclusion of this chronicle. The sundial moves forward yet another year, to May of 2009, and, you guessed it, we’re chilling again at the Horseshoe Bay Ferry Terminal. It’s way too early to be drinking anything but coffee, but it’s another bluebird day, and this time we’re going to find that tree, right? The Simpsons imitations are flowing freely, and I’m doing my best Troy McClure Continue reading The Saga of the Red Creek Fir, Part 3 of 3

The Saga of the Red Creek Fir, Part 2 of 3

The months rolled by, the pages of the calendar turned, sometimes slowly, sometimes swiftly, as life goes. Now it was May of 2008. Chris and I had resolved to try again on a spring day to find the Red Creek Fir and so, there we were again, somewhat livelier, in line again at 5 am for the ferry to Nanaimo. Filled with laughter and optimism, how could we possibly fail?  [sarcasm/] Well, keep reading, for more insight into that rather unlikely scenario [/sarcasm] Continue reading The Saga of the Red Creek Fir, Part 2 of 3

The Saga of the Red Creek Fir, Part 1 of 3

There are times that a wilderness excursion is but a simplistic jaunt, that is to say: you make a plan, you follow that plan, and everything goes as planned. Here then, is a trilogy or an epic of sorts, describing that what can go swimmingly for some can somehow become an exercise in perseverance for others Continue reading The Saga of the Red Creek Fir, Part 1 of 3

Travels and adventures past and present, from camping to hiking to searching for B.C.'s remaining old growth trees, and treks to the mountains