Tag Archives: Canada

A Trio of Lakes and Tricouni Peak

The wheels of Chris’s Jeep Cherokee bucked back and forth with a most ungainly rhythm as we drove upΒ Squamish Valley’s BR 200 logging spur. Our destination, Tricouni Peak, awaited us at the head of High Falls Creek, high on the Squamish-Cheakamus Divide. Continue reading A Trio of Lakes and Tricouni Peak

The Rustic Charm of the Arbutus Tree

 

If you live in Southwestern British Columbia, no doubt you’ll remember your first encounter with the Arbutus. It makes quite a captivating first impression, and with its multiple trunks, peeling red bark, and rhododendron like leaves, this is a tree that compels you to look skyward at its twisting limbs Continue reading The Rustic Charm of the Arbutus Tree

The Heart of Owl and Talon Creek

It was the spring of 2004, and I was poring over an old Western Canada Wilderness Committee (WCWC) map when four simple words caught my eye: Owl and Talon Creek. The name alone sounded intriguing enough, but there was also a grove of trees there called the Pipe Organ Firs. Recently, I’d had the chance to meet Ralf Kelman, perhaps Β British Columbia’s most established tree hunter, and he had told me about Continue reading The Heart of Owl and Talon Creek

A Bad Case of the Bens, Part Two

By the time we reached the bench below Ben Lomond, it was half past decision time for me. I badly wanted to stand on that summit and look down on the Seymour Valley below! Problem was, I could not bring my knee any higher than my waist, and was having major trouble kicking steps. Ben Lomond Continue reading A Bad Case of the Bens, Part Two

Finding Norvan’s Castle

 

It conjures up the grandest of images, like, say, the sturdiest of stone castles standing high on a bluff above the crashing waves of the North Sea, seemingly indestructible. While that may be fun to imagine, how many among you would have thought the name actually referred to a tree? Set deep within the forests of Lynn Headwaters Regional Park, Norvan’s Castle is, by volume, the fourth largest Western Hemlock on the planet. Its nine and a half foot diameter at breast height also makes it the widest one on record! The three trees that are of larger volume are all found south of the border on Washington state’s Olympic Peninsula.

Continue reading Finding Norvan’s Castle

Snow Riding the Seymour Valley

With the mercury dropping and the white stuff presumably on its way at some point, I’m reminded of one of the North Shore Mountains more underrated pleasures. That pastime, folks, is riding your mountain bike in the snow, and when I lived in North Vancouver, it was something I used to do whenever I got the chance! So why, you ask, would someone really want to layer on clothing, don thick gloves, and breathe in the cold, drafty winds of the Seymour Valley? Well, because it’s fun, that’s why!

Continue reading Snow Riding the Seymour Valley

Chester’s Grove, Back to the Future

“I’m not sure I remember that being there!” That comment, uttered by yours truly a few weeks ago, is one I seem to make more often these days. The thing is, I think I’m getting to the point in life where some memories seem crystal clear, while others seem so nonexistent they might as well be Continue reading Chester’s Grove, Back to the Future

The Trouble With Joffre, Part Two

Welcome to the rest of the story! In Part One, I spent some time outlining the problems that have befallen Joffre Lakes Provincial Park. Things such as overcrowding, mismanagement, and poor behaviour from the hiking community have combined to propel the park into crisis mode Continue reading The Trouble With Joffre, Part Two

The Cheewhat Lake Cedar

I had wanted to see it for years, and finally did so in autumn of 2012. Located in a quiet corner of Pacific Rim National Park Reserve on Vancouver Island, the Cheewhat Lake Cedar Continue reading The Cheewhat Lake Cedar

A Walk in the Clouds, Mt Cokely in August

Mt Cokely sounded like an interesting destination. I had read about the trip on the Island Mountain Ramblers page several weeks before, and though at first it was fully booked, I managed to latch on when a few people cancelled. The plan,
for our group of ten, was to ascend the Saddle Trail, scramble up to the ridge of Cokely, and then further on to the summit. Continue reading A Walk in the Clouds, Mt Cokely in August