Tag Archives: Coast Mountains

The Winds of Change Come to Downton Creek

 

 Mountain trips in September are compelling, when you time them correctly. As summer struggles to fend off the inevitable arrival of autumn, the stage is set for a unique experience, if you can get the weather to cooperate. High in the heart of the Lillooet Ranges, nearly a decade ago, that was certainly the case when we visited Downton Creek. Continue reading The Winds of Change Come to Downton Creek

Hiking the Hydraulic Creek Trail


It comes as a surprise to most of the people who know me well, but truthfully, it wasn’t until late in 2003 that I first discovered the existence of the Hydraulic Creek Trail. Continue reading Hiking the Hydraulic Creek Trail

A Return to the Eagles Nest Grove

 

It was a sunny spring morning back in May of 2018, silent save for the sounds of birds and my bicycle, as I crossed the Hydraulic Creek Bridge in the Lower Seymour Conservation Reserve (LSCR). A ride up the Seymour Valley Trailway was nothing unusual for me, but this one was distinctively different. Continue reading A Return to the Eagles Nest Grove

That Mountain Really Named Cypress

If you live in British Columbia, you probably have heard of Cypress Mountain, right? After all, several events of the 2010 Olympic Winter Games were hosted there. Well ironically, that Cypress Mountain exists in name only. Continue reading That Mountain Really Named Cypress

A Trio of Lakes and Tricouni Peak

The wheels of Chris’s Jeep Cherokee bucked back and forth with a most ungainly rhythm as we drove up Squamish Valley’s BR 200 logging spur. Our destination, Tricouni Peak, awaited us at the head of High Falls Creek, high on the Squamish-Cheakamus Divide. Continue reading A Trio of Lakes and Tricouni Peak

Mick Bailey – Hunting Giants in British Columbia

Hi readers! This week I thought I’d share this interview I did recently with Greg from Terra Mano. It’s the subject this week of his Stories from the Mountain feature. Telling my own story behind the adventures is not something I tend to do, so this was fun. Read on, for the story behind the stories!  

Continue reading Mick Bailey – Hunting Giants in British Columbia

The Hollyburn Giant

It stands in a clearing of its own creation, amid a forest that has somehow not seen the ravages of fire for over four thousand years. They call it the Hollyburn Giant, and though it’s merely a shadow of what it once was, this legendary tree has been estimated to be as old as 1400 years. Sometimes confused with the Hollyburn Fir, this Yellow Cedar grows on the opposite side of Hollyburn Mountain, and at a much higher elevation. It’s one of the many wonders of British Columbia’s Cypress Provincial Park Continue reading The Hollyburn Giant

The Heart of Owl and Talon Creek

It was the spring of 2004, and I was poring over an old Western Canada Wilderness Committee (WCWC) map when four simple words caught my eye: Owl and Talon Creek. The name alone sounded intriguing enough, but there was also a grove of trees there called the Pipe Organ Firs. Recently, I’d had the chance to meet Ralf Kelman, perhaps  British Columbia’s most established tree hunter, and he had told me about Continue reading The Heart of Owl and Talon Creek

North Creek and Vicinity

 

It was an early evening in October of 2009 when the phone rang. On the other end of the line was Chris, and we soon found ourselves in the midst of a friendly debate over where we were planning on hiking the next day. I had my mind set on Coquihalla Mountain via the west ridge, having seen it the year before while climbing Jim Kelly Peak. Barring that, I was up for a return to Cypress Peak, or maybe Cloudburst Mountain. Out of the blue, Chris uttered “Have you ever heard of Hemionus Mountain?” “No, I have no idea where that is.” “Well, I’m off to eat dinner right now, so while I do that you can look it up.”

Continue reading North Creek and Vicinity

A Bad Case of The Bens, Part One

Ben Lomond, to me, will never be just another mountain. Even from a distance, this sharp granite horn pierces the sky in a way that can only create a momentous first impression. The peak is located on the divide between the Seymour and Stawamus Rivers at the head of Clipper Creek, and this story, while it dates back some fourteen years, might as well have been yesterday in my mind. 

Continue reading A Bad Case of The Bens, Part One