Tag Archives: LSCR

Wandering Seymour Valley’s Old Growth Trail

When the topic of Seymour Valley’s big trees comes up, as it often does in my world, one of the first places I recommend visiting is the Old Growth Trail. Set deep in the heart of the valley near the Seymour Dam, and surrounded by the North Shore Mountains, it has a magic you won’t find anywhere else! 

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An ancient forest of the Old Growth Trail is always a captivating experience

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The Unheralded Stoney Creek Fir

Nearly nine kilometres along the Seymour Valley Trailway, in North Vancouver’s Lower Seymour Conservation Reserve (LSCR), stands a distinctively towering Douglas Fir. It receives thousands and thousands of visitors every year, standing as it does, alongside a popular recreational trail.

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A Return to the Eagles Nest Grove

 

It was a sunny spring morning back in May of 2018, silent save for the sounds of birds and my bicycle, as I crossed the Hydraulic Creek Bridge in the Lower Seymour Conservation Reserve (LSCR). A ride up the Seymour Valley Trailway was nothing unusual for me, but this one was distinctively different. Continue reading A Return to the Eagles Nest Grove

The Heart of Owl and Talon Creek

It was the spring of 2004, and I was poring over an old Western Canada Wilderness Committee (WCWC) map when four simple words caught my eye: Owl and Talon Creek. The name alone sounded intriguing enough, but there was also a grove of trees there called the Pipe Organ Firs. Recently, I’d had the chance to meet Ralf Kelman, perhaps  British Columbia’s most established tree hunter, and he had told me about Continue reading The Heart of Owl and Talon Creek

Snow Riding the Seymour Valley

With the mercury dropping and the white stuff presumably on its way at some point, I’m reminded of one of the North Shore Mountains more underrated pleasures. That pastime, folks, is riding your mountain bike in the snow, and when I lived in North Vancouver, it was something I used to do whenever I got the chance! So why, you ask, would someone really want to layer on clothing, don thick gloves, and breathe in the cold, drafty winds of the Seymour Valley? Well, because it’s fun, that’s why!

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Tree of the Week: The See More Stump

If you happen to be out for a nice summer bike ride in the Seymour Valley this year, keep an eye out for a marker at just past the 6 km mark on the Seymour Valley Trailway. As you head north it will be on your left, on the uphill side. Just a minute or two off the road is the massive stump of an ancient Western Red Cedar, on what is called the See More Stumps Trail Continue reading Tree of the Week: The See More Stump

The Grove That Time Forgot

He named it the Mary Jewell Cedar, after his closest companion. I never did get to see it for myself, but Vancouver artist Ralf Kelman described it to me as quite a sight to behold. It was a venerable cedar, roughly twelve feet in diameter, with an expansive hollow chamber, and perhaps seven centuries old Continue reading The Grove That Time Forgot

North Shore Boys Storm the South Needle

It was, of all things, a chance encounter. He had read several of my trip reports, posted on a hiking forum, on relatively obscure pursuits in the North Shore Mountains, and simply sent me a message. At first I was not even certain I’d answer, as I’m given to solo pursuits, but for whatever reason I did. That was in late May of 2004, and it likely marked a distinct change in the course of both of our lives. That was how I met Doug, who has become a regular partner in crime on so many of my most enjoyable trips, and one of my closest friends Continue reading North Shore Boys Storm the South Needle

In Search of the Eagles Nest Grove

It was May of 2004, and I found myself biking up the Eastside Road in the Lower Seymour Conservation Reserve, a favourite destination of mine. At one time, not so long ago, this valley was home to magnificent stands of old growth forest. Now, though much has been lost, the area’s timber is  protected for future generations to enjoy. That day, I was in search of the Eagles Nest Grove Continue reading In Search of the Eagles Nest Grove