Tag Archives: North Shore Mountains

Hiking the Hydraulic Creek Trail


It comes as a surprise to most of the people who know me well, but truthfully, it wasn’t until late in 2003 that I first discovered the existence of the Hydraulic Creek Trail. Continue reading Hiking the Hydraulic Creek Trail

A Return to the Eagles Nest Grove

 

It was a sunny spring morning back in May of 2018, silent save for the sounds of birds and my bicycle, as I crossed the Hydraulic Creek Bridge in the Lower Seymour Conservation Reserve (LSCR). A ride up the Seymour Valley Trailway was nothing unusual for me, but this one was distinctively different. Continue reading A Return to the Eagles Nest Grove

The Westside Cedar

The Big Cedar Trail to Kennedy Falls is aptly named. Roughly two and half kilometres from the trailhead, the track leads intrepid hikers to an ancient Western Red Cedar that’s over six hundred and fifty years old! Ironically, however, those who reach it have often unknowingly walked right by an equally formidable specimen. Continue reading The Westside Cedar

Mick Bailey – Hunting Giants in British Columbia

Hi readers! This week I thought I’d share this interview I did recently with Greg from Terra Mano. It’s the subject this week of his Stories from the Mountain feature. Telling my own story behind the adventures is not something I tend to do, so this was fun. Read on, for the story behind the stories!  

Continue reading Mick Bailey – Hunting Giants in British Columbia

The Hollyburn Giant

It stands in a clearing of its own creation, amid a forest that has somehow not seen the ravages of fire for over four thousand years. They call it the Hollyburn Giant, and though it’s merely a shadow of what it once was, this legendary tree has been estimated to be as old as 1400 years. Sometimes confused with the Hollyburn Fir, this Yellow Cedar grows on the opposite side of Hollyburn Mountain, and at a much higher elevation. It’s one of the many wonders of British Columbia’s Cypress Provincial Park Continue reading The Hollyburn Giant

The Heart of Owl and Talon Creek

It was the spring of 2004, and I was poring over an old Western Canada Wilderness Committee (WCWC) map when four simple words caught my eye: Owl and Talon Creek. The name alone sounded intriguing enough, but there was also a grove of trees there called the Pipe Organ Firs. Recently, I’d had the chance to meet Ralf Kelman, perhaps  British Columbia’s most established tree hunter, and he had told me about Continue reading The Heart of Owl and Talon Creek

Finding Norvan’s Castle

 

It conjures up the grandest of images, like, say, the sturdiest of stone castles standing high on a bluff above the crashing waves of the North Sea, seemingly indestructible. While that may be fun to imagine, how many among you would have thought the name actually referred to a tree? Set deep within the forests of Lynn Headwaters Regional Park, Norvan’s Castle is, by volume, the fourth largest Western Hemlock on the planet. Its nine and a half foot diameter at breast height also makes it the widest one on record! The three trees that are of larger volume are all found south of the border on Washington state’s Olympic Peninsula.

Continue reading Finding Norvan’s Castle

Snow Riding the Seymour Valley

With the mercury dropping and the white stuff presumably on its way at some point, I’m reminded of one of the North Shore Mountains more underrated pleasures. That pastime, folks, is riding your mountain bike in the snow, and when I lived in North Vancouver, it was something I used to do whenever I got the chance! So why, you ask, would someone really want to layer on clothing, don thick gloves, and breathe in the cold, drafty winds of the Seymour Valley? Well, because it’s fun, that’s why!

Continue reading Snow Riding the Seymour Valley

A Monday on Brunswick

 

Sometimes I ruminate on the passage of time. It’s peculiar, in that that some things seem to take an eternity, and others seem to flash by like leaves in November wind.
At any rate, as time relates to this tale, it has now been nearly a year and a half since I moved from North Vancouver to Nanaimo. As much as I’m enjoying the island life so far, occasionally I still find myself reminiscing about places I’ve visited in the North Shore Mountains. Brunswick Mountain, for reasons I’ll explain, comes to mind quite often!  Continue reading A Monday on Brunswick

On Standing Down

The annals of mountaineering, especially those of social media offering, are so often filled with the stories of success. That is, you plan the trek, face the adversities, and eventually stand triumphant and heroic on the summit before staring down the descent Continue reading On Standing Down