Saving the North Shore’s Big Cedar, a Call to Action

 

At the dawn of the twentieth century, old growth forests in the North Shore Mountains were taken for granted. So many massive trees still stood tall and strong then that it was believed their supply was nearly infinite. In today’s era, sadly, we know better. The few ancient specimens that persevere are invaluable to our heritage and ecology!  Continue reading Saving the North Shore’s Big Cedar, a Call to Action

The Winds of Change Come to Downton Creek

 

 Mountain trips in September are compelling, when you time them correctly. As summer struggles to fend off the inevitable arrival of autumn, the stage is set for a unique experience, if you can get the weather to cooperate. High in the heart of the Lillooet Ranges, nearly a decade ago, that was certainly the case when we visited Downton Creek. Continue reading The Winds of Change Come to Downton Creek

Hiking the Hydraulic Creek Trail


It comes as a surprise to most of the people who know me well, but truthfully, it wasn’t until late in 2003 that I first discovered the existence of the Hydraulic Creek Trail. Continue reading Hiking the Hydraulic Creek Trail

A Return to the Eagles Nest Grove

 

It was a sunny spring morning back in May of 2018, silent save for the sounds of birds and my bicycle, as I crossed the Hydraulic Creek Bridge in the Lower Seymour Conservation Reserve (LSCR). A ride up the Seymour Valley Trailway was nothing unusual for me, but this one was distinctively different. Continue reading A Return to the Eagles Nest Grove

The Westside Cedar

The Big Cedar Trail to Kennedy Falls is aptly named. Roughly two and half kilometres from the trailhead, the track leads intrepid hikers to an ancient Western Red Cedar that’s over six hundred and fifty years old! Ironically, however, those who reach it have often unknowingly walked right by an equally formidable specimen. Continue reading The Westside Cedar

That Mountain Really Named Cypress

If you live in British Columbia, you probably have heard of Cypress Mountain, right? After all, several events of the 2010 Olympic Winter Games were hosted there. Well ironically, that Cypress Mountain exists in name only. Continue reading That Mountain Really Named Cypress

The Wickenden Creek Giant

It sits in silence, even unobtrusively, in a clearing on Wickenden Creek’s north bank. That in itself is quite a feat, because this ancient Western Red Cedar measures in at 4.85 metres in diameter, which is just a shade under sixteen feet wide! The Wickenden Creek Giant is one of the most impressive cedars I’ve seen on British Columbia’s mainland, and the fact that it still stands today is a miracle in itself! Continue reading The Wickenden Creek Giant

Exploring Qualicum Heritage Forest

Qualicum Beach, to most, is a quiet seaside community on Vancouver Island’s east coast. It sits in the shadow of Mt Arrowsmith on the Salish Sea, not far from Parksville. It’s best known as a summer resort and a great golf location, but if you start to look around,  there’s a lot more there than first meets the eye. Continue reading Exploring Qualicum Heritage Forest

A Trio of Lakes and Tricouni Peak

The wheels of Chris’s Jeep Cherokee bucked back and forth with a most ungainly rhythm as we drove up Squamish Valley’s BR 200 logging spur. Our destination, Tricouni Peak, awaited us at the head of High Falls Creek, high on the Squamish-Cheakamus Divide. Continue reading A Trio of Lakes and Tricouni Peak

Travels and adventures past and present, from camping to hiking to searching for B.C.'s remaining old growth trees, and treks to the mountains